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by John Klaassen | Apologetics
Every Wednesday, a Muslim woman would come to meet with a group of ladies at our house. Over sweet mint tea, they would start in the Old Testament and work their way toward Jesus. After they met, the woman would leave as quickly as she came. Then, one day, it all changed. Jesus became more than a...
by John Klaassen | Apologetics
Prayer is the biggest block and the foundation for working with any people group. To neglect this block is to take away your foundation and ignore what God wants to do in the lives of the people with whom you work. Jesus says in Luke 10, “the harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few....
by John Klaassen | Apologetics
Finally, let me give you an easy- to-remember bridge to use as you share the gospel with your Muslim friend. Whenever you meet Muslims, they’ll say, “As- salam alaykum,” meaning “peace be on you.” Ask them about that peace, where it comes from, how it’s attained, whether anyone can have it and...
by John Klaassen | Apologetics
Presence, the second largest of our blocks, is about being with your Muslim friends. Muslims, and middle-easterners in general, are event-oriented people. It’s not about “quality time” for them; it’s about the quantity of time you spend with them. This is difficult for most of us to understand...
by John Klaassen | Apologetics
Proclamation is sharing of the good news, and the pyramid cannot exist without it. Religious conversations are never difficult to get into with a Muslim, but they can be difficult to end without starting a debate. If you have practiced the first two “P’s,” you’ll find that your friend will listen...
by John Klaassen | Apologetics
The smallest of the “P’s” is persuasion, which is also the point of the pyramid – or the tip of the spear, to use another metaphor. Once you’ve established a strong relationship with your friend, you can say what needs to be said. You must eventually share that Jesus is the only way to have peace...
by Dan DeWitt | Apologetics
The first person to predict a solar eclipse was the philosopher Thales in 585 B.C. Do you think he knew not to look at directly at the sun back then? Christian pastor and author R.C. Sproul says that this was the day science was born.
by John Stonestreet | Apologetics
To begin to answer this, a couple of things should be kept in mind. First, it is important to remember whom we are talking about. God, the all-powerful Creator of the universe, answers to no one. He doesn’t ask for approval for his...
by Kenneth D. Boa | Apologetics
Apologetics may be simply defined as the defense of the Christian faith. The simplicity of this definition, however, masks the complexity of the problem of defining apologetics. It turns out that a diversity of approaches has been taken in defining the meaning, scope, and purpose of apologetics.
by Dan DeWitt | Apologetics
Sharing the gospel with skeptics is not an endeavor to be taken lightly. It is a risky enterprise, and the greatest risks involve the apologist’s own soul. That’s why C.S. Lewis, in the midst of his WWII evangelistic endeavors, warned youth leaders of the need to walk circumspectly when operating...
Apologetics
The other day something reminded me of the popular 1993 book, “The Celestine Prophecy” (anyone remember that?). “The Celestine Prophecy” is a fiction book that discusses ideas rooted in New Age spirituality. The book sold 20 million copies and practically spawned its own cult-like religion, with...
by Lee Strobel | Apologetics
That’s probably why I ended up combining the study of law and journalism to become the legal editor of The Chicago Tribune—a career in which I relentlessly pursued hard facts in my investigations. And that’s undoubtedly why I was later attracted to a thorough examination of the evidence—whether...
by Jeffrey Burton Russell | Apologetics
The great psychologist Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) called Christianity a “fairy tale.” The phrase derived in the 1700s from the French conte de fées (“ story about fairies”) and has now become shorthand for a story that is both false and silly. We hear remarks such as “I don’t believe in the tooth...
by Doug Powell | Apologetics
Some believers are suspicious of and opposed to apologetics. They view it as being contrary to faith. They fear that if Christianity can be shown to be reasonable, then there is no place for faith. This anti-intellectual approach to Christianity is rooted in a misunderstanding of the word “faith”...
by Kirk Lowery | Apologetics
Is the Bible “history”? Did the ancient biblical authors write “history” as we moderns understand it? These questions are essential elements of the debate about the trustworthiness and authority of the Bible. In recent years, the usefulness of the Bible for writing the history of the ancient Near...
Tollers and Jack Blog Post
by Doug Powell | Apologetics
A good example of an informed, gracious Christian’s participation in the salvation of another took place on September 19, 1931, at Magdalen College, Oxford. That evening three men were strolling along Addison’s Walk. One man, Jack, was a longtime atheist who had recently embraced theism but had...
by Jeffrey Burton Russell | Apologetics
Christianity is often confusing to the outsider and even to the insider. We often hear different things in different denominations, different churches and different college courses. Where do we go for a straight answer? The evidence. Christianity is a relatively coherent system about which...
by D. James Kennedy | Apologetics
Some time ago I had the opportunity to speak to a man who had no belief whatsoever in the Scriptures as any sort of divine revelation from God. He was a writer who was articulate and well-educated. While he was well-read, he was completely ignorant of any evidences for the truthfulness of the...
by Dan DeWitt | Apologetics
I remember my good friend Mark’s quote in our senior yearbook as if it were published yesterday. Though we attended a public school, he didn’t shy away from sharing his beliefs. Under his senior picture he placed this verse; “the grass withers and the flower fades but the Word of our God will...
by Gabriel Pagel | Apologetics
It is sometimes tempting to mix Christianity with beliefs from other religions. Combining beliefs from different faiths is called syncretism. We see examples of this today in interfaith chapels, people identifying themselves as Christian Buddhists or New Age Christians, and in Bibles that include...
by Natasha Crain | Apologetics
In our backyard we used to have a beautiful lime tree. One day I noticed that a thorny vine of some kind had started growing around it. It looked enough like the rest of the tree that I figured it was just another stage of growth. A quick Google search told me thorns often grow around citrus...
by Ched Spellman | Apologetics
Toward the end of the fourth century, a preacher named John Chrysostom wasns he says, “For we ought not as soon as we retire from the Communion, to plunge into business unsuited to the Communion, but as soon as ever we get home, to take our Bible into our hands, and call our wife and children to...
by Dan DeWitt | Apologetics
The Bible is true! Why do you believe that? Because the Bible tells me so! Isn't this just a big loop? Couldn't anyone from any religion make the same claim about their sacred writings? Yes and yes. Does this mean religious people are crazy? No. Here's why: Every way of seeing the world...
by Kirk Lowery | Apologetics
The modern reader of the Bible—especially of the Old Testament—often finds its use of numbers strange. The ancient world did not use numbers for every aspect of life. Their technology did not require many places past the decimal point of precision, or even a decimal point at all. The Bible has...
by Jeffrey Burton Russell | Apologetics
The basic meaning of “myth” is a traditional story about gods or heroes: Athena sprang from the brow of Zeus; Hercules slew the hydra. Most religions—along with most political and social groups—have their myths, but religions are not themselves myths. Christianity is far too complex an...
by Dan DeWitt | Apologetics
Mankind is not morally neutral. When you share the gospel, you don’t speak to someone who is devoid of worldview commitments. You don’t witness in a spiritual vacuum. The Bible makes this abundantly clear. Consider Psalm 10, where the wicked says in verse five, “there is no God,” and later in...
by Derwin Gray | Apologetics
While listening to your iPod and sipping a Cinnamon Dolce Latté from Starbucks, have you ever wondered if your pet will be in heaven? I’m pretty sure cats will not be there because they make me sneeze. Just kidding! But seriously, will our pets be in heaven? What about sex and marriage? Will...
by Jeffrey Burton Russell | Apologetics
This is a widely held belief, but if it were true there wouldn’t be so many scientists who are Christians. Science and religion are not at odds. The issue is not between science and religion but between two metaphysical worldviews. View “a” is that there is no such thing as the...
by Doug Powell | Apologetics
The word “cosmos” is a Greek word that refers to everything that exists—the universe itself and all its constituents. The cosmological argument for the existence of God tries to show that because anything exists there must be a God who brought it into existence. In other words, without a God to...
by Dan DeWitt | Apologetics
Nearly everyone I’ve known who is active in apologetic work deeply understands the necessity of the Spirit to bring about conversion. I’ve never met an apologist who sincerely believed his arguments could, in and of themselves, change someone’s heart. I have, however, met many who pray fervently...
by Natasha Crain | Apologetics
In prior posts, I’ve talked about why parents have to care about apologetics (the reasoned defense of Christianity) and I’ve shared resources for getting started with apologetics. I realize, however, that it can seem pretty ambiguous to have a goal of “learning apologetics.” We need to know the...
by Kirk Lowery | Apologetics
Whether it is a simple story or a complex history, a key element is time. It establishes cause and effect, act and consequence. The books of Kings are not exempt from the need to relate one event to another in time. The author traces the action of kings and rulers throughout time by recording the...
by Matt Bennett | Apologetics
For the last seven years, my family and I lived in the Middle East as Christians in the midst of majority Muslim countries. During this time, we ran a business that hosted upwards of twenty “cultural exposure trips” consisting of small groups of Americans who visited us, learned about the...
by J. Steve Lee | Apologetics
On Dec. 2, 2015, a mass shooting by two terrorists killed 14 people in California’s Inland Regional Center. Three years earlier, a gunman forced his way into Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut and shot 20 first graders and six adults. From shootings like these to natural disasters that...
Apologetics
The Kalam argument tries to show that the universe is not eternal, that it have to have a beginning. This argument was first formulated by Christian philosophers, but it did not find its full force until medieval Islamic thinkers devoted attention to the argument. 'Kalam' is an Arabic word...
Apologetics
America is changing fast, and not in the direction we’d like. In light of recent events, I don’t think I need to detail all the signs that point to an imploding society. We see it. We feel it. We fear it. Instead, I want to focus on our role as Christian parents within a society like ours. In...
Apologetics
The predominant superstition of our times is Progress. Belief in lower-case 'progress' is reasonable, for progress can be made toward definable goals in specific fields, such as electrical engineering, plumbing or surgery. But people often believe in upper-case Progress, as in “The Progress of...
by Jason K. Lee | Apologetics
There are you in line at the mall department store. You normally do your shopping online, but during the Christmas season it’s different. You fight through the Christmas traffic and parking. You walk through the crowded stores decorated with Christmas wreaths, Christmas trees, and candy canes....
by Matt Bennett | Apologetics
In the final post of this series on engaging in gospel-directed conversations with Muslims, I want to respond to one of the most common questions we get from our friends in the US regarding ministry to Muslims: Where do we even start? Before offering some very practical ways to begin, I want to...
Apologetics
This post gives a brief overview of five of the most common objections to Christianity that we hear from our Muslim friends. Though I cannot give an exhaustive treatment of these topics, I do want to offer some Bible passages to provide natural access points through which to invite our Muslim...
by Kenneth A. Mathews | Apologetics
Biblical genealogies must be understood in the context of the ancient Near East. Typically, genealogies expressed more than family descent. They reflected political and socio-religious realities among people groups. For example, “Salma fathered Bethlehem” (1 Chron. 2:51) describes the founder of...
by Travis Kerns | Apologetics
Imagine the following situation: You’re talking to a group of people in a coffee shop, and the issue of religion comes up. Having just met them, you don’t know the religious beliefs of the others around you, so you bring up the teachings of Jesus. You make the claim that the teachings of Jesus...
by Sean McDowell | Apologetics
A few summers ago, I spoke at a camp in California. Topics for the week included intelligent design, the reliability of Scripture, and the historical resurrection of Jesus. On the last day of camp, a young Christian woman complained that proving the existence of God left no room for faith....
by Jeffrey Burton Russell | Apologetics
One frequent misunderstanding of Christianity is that it is anti-environment. The misconception is based on a certain reading of the book of Genesis, on the alleged record of Christianity over time, and on the current beliefs of some Christians that the end of the world is at hand. In truth,...
by Doug Powell | Apologetics
In the 13th century, Thomas Aquinas gave three forms of the cosmological argument in his Summa Theologica as a part of his “five ways” of proving the existence of God. Aquinas’s thinking was this: “Since nature works for a determinate end under the direction of a higher agent, whatever is done...
by Natasha Crain | Apologetics
Today I want to shed light on a nasty little “fact” that regularly makes the rounds online: "Studies show that Christians are less intelligent than atheists." This statement is proudly tossed about by atheists who want to reinforce their claims that religion is for the poor, ignorant, and...
by Travis Kerns | Apologetics
Now that we understand why we should be concerned for members of other religions, we come to our second question: What is the message of Christianity? The message of Christianity is a profoundly simple (though not simplistic) message of sin, atonement, and redemption — all through Christ. If the...
by Jeffrey Burton Russell | Apologetics
Jesus said, and the apostles confirmed, that the truth of Christianity was to be preached to all people of every nation. The earliest Christians were mostly Near Easterners and Africans. There is no evidence of racial discrimination against blacks or any other racial groups in early Christianity....
by Dave Sterret | Apologetics
Have you ever been in a situation where you knew that what you were about to do was wrong? Maybe you lied to your parents. Maybe you gave into temptation and drank alcohol. Or maybe you compromised your sexual standards and allowed your passion to take over. Each of us has acted in ways we knew...
by Chad Brand | Apologetics
As in other areas of Christian practice — worship, prayer, preaching, and counseling — evangelism needs to be undergirded by a theological reflection on just what it is we are doing and why this is because, as R.B. Kuiper puts it, “evangelism has its roots in eternity.” In this article, I won’t...
by E. Ray Clendenen | Apologetics
The ancient Egyptian equivalent of a “voodoo doll” was to write one’s enemy’s name on a clay statue or pottery vessel and then smash the pot while pronouncing a curse. Archaeologists have uncovered hundreds of such pottery pieces, called “execration texts.” Dating about the time of Joseph...
by Jeffrey Burton Russell | Apologetics
Christians are often said to believe because they need a crutch. Unless a person is willing to agonize hourly in the actual conviction that his or her life is really and truly meaningless, everyone needs a crutch — a basis of support — of some kind. But Christianity is often singled out and...
by Doug Powell | Apologetics
Why is there something rather than nothing? This is the famous question of philosopher G.W.F. von Leibniz, whose cosmological argument took a slightly different approach than Aquinas’s. Instead of arguing from cause itself, Leibniz argued there must be a sufficient reason for the existence of the...
by Natasha Crain | Apologetics
Last week during our Bible time with the kids, we were talking about God’s love for us and what exactly that means. As the conversation progressed, I asked my kids (ages 6 and 5), “And how do we even know God loves us?” For purposes of that particular conversation, I was simply expecting them to...
by Ched Spellman | Apologetics
After demonstrating that the biblical canon came to be, we are in a better position to ask further, why did the biblical canon come into existence in the first place? Here, we are asking about the catalysts for canon formation. Why is there canon rather than chaos? Why is there an ordered...
by E. Ray Clendenen | Apologetics
According to Genesis 15:6, Abram did not buy righteousness with his faith. Rather, God gave Abram righteousness, which means right standing or acceptability before God. The biblical message is clear and consistent in both testaments: The curse of condemnation and death that rests on everyone...